Coolamon Rotary News Bulletin #11

Coolamon Rotary News Bulletin #11




THE NEW ROTARY LOGO LAUNCHED on the 26 August 2013





Diary Reminders

Thursday 12th September BINGO:  Christine Atkinson, Mark Reardon, Dick Jennings, Neil Munro

Monday 16th September Guest Speaker  Dr. Paul Weston BSc (Cornell), MSc (MichStateUni), PhD (MichStateUni) as our guest speaker.

Paul will be talking about his time in the USA prior to migrating to Australia.  Followed by a Board Meeting all members requested to attend.

*Monday 30th September DG Geoff Tancred's Visit.

Sunday 6th October Coolamon Scarecrow Festival.

Monday 7th October NO Meeting Labour Day Weekend.

Thursday 10th October BINGO:   Ian Jennings, John Glassford, Grahame Miles, Ted Hutcheon

Saturday 12th October Coolamon and Ganmain Hospital Fete IN Ganmain.

Saturday 26th October Street Raffle in Coolamon.

Saturday 22nd and Sunday 23rd February PETS in Young

Friday 14th March Trike Convention Catering in Wagga Wagga proceeds to Ronald McDonald House in Wagga Wagga.

Friday March 21st-Sunday March 23rd D9700 Conference in Orange.

Sunday 18th May D9700 Assembly in Grenfell

Saturday 24th May Red Shield Appeal Street Stall.

Sunday June 1st-Wednesday June 4th.  SYDNEY 2014 RI Convention See promotion at the end of this bulletin.

*Partners and Guests Night.



President Burton with Past RI Director K.R. "Ravi" Ravindran, who also was selected by the Nominating Committee for President of RI in 2015-16 — in Singapore at the Zone 4, 5, 6A Institute this week.




$Million Question

A contestant Sally, on 'Who wants to be a Millionaire?' had reached the final plateau. If she answered the next question correctly, she would win $1,000,000. If she answered incorrectly, she would pocket only the $25,000 milestone money.

And as she suspected it would be, the million-dollar question was no pushover. It was, 'Which of the following species of birds does not build its own nest but instead lays its eggs in the nests of other birds? Is it:

A ) the condor

B ) the buzzard

C ) the cuckoo

D ) the vulture

The woman was on the spot. She did not know the answer. She had used up her 50/50 Lifeline and her Ask the Audience Lifeline. All that remained was her Phone-a-Friend Lifeline. She hoped she would not have to use it because her friend was, well, blonde. But she had no alternative.

She called her friend and gave her the question and the four choices.

The blonde responded unhesitatingly, 'that's easy. The answer is C: the cuckoo.'

The contestant had to make a decision and make it fast. She considered employing a reverse strategy and giving Meredith any answer except the one that her friend had given her. And considering her friend was a blonde that would seem to be the logical thing to do. But her friend had responded with such confidence, such certitude, that the contestant could not help but be convinced.

'I need an answer,' said Meredith.

Crossing her fingers, the contestant said, 'C: The cuckoo.'

'Is that your final answer?'

'Yes, that is my final answer.'

And Meredith replied, 'that answer is.... Absolutely correct! You are now a millionaire!'

Three days later, the contestant hosted a party for her family and friends, including the blonde who had helped her win the million dollars.

'Joni, I just do not know how to thank you,' said the contestant. 'How did you happen to know the right answer?'

'Oh, come on,' said the blonde. 'Everybody knows that cuckoos don't build nests. They live in clocks.'




Rotary has approved a $500,000 Rapid Response grant to the World Health Organization (WHO) to address a recent polio outbreak in Somalia. The outbreak occurred in the Banadir region of Somalia, where a large number of children had not been vaccinated against polio due to inaccessibility.

As of 14 August, 110 cases of wild poliovirus have been reported in the Horn of Africa—100 cases in Somalia and 10 in Kenya. This is the first outbreak in Somalia since 2007 and in Kenya since 2011.

The Rotary grant will cover operational costs, including human resources, training, and transportation of health workers, aimed at immunizing children under 10 in all accessible areas of Somalia in August.

To date, five vaccination campaigns have been held in Somalia, three in Kenya, two each in Ethiopia and Yemen, and one in Djibouti.  Additional campaigns are planned through the end of the year.











Pangolins, often called “scaly anteaters,” are covered in tough, overlapping scales. These burrowing mammals eat ants and termites using an extraordinarily long, sticky tongue, and are able to quickly roll themselves up into a tight ball when threatened. Eight different pangolin species can be found across Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Poaching for illegal wildlife trade and habitat loss have made these incredible creatures one of the most endangered groups of mammals in the world.

Pangolins are highly prized targets for wildlife traffickers in Asia. As the only mammals with scales, pangolins are thought to contain medicinal properties. Wildlife buyers will purchase pangolin hides, scales, and meat. Some pangolins are also bought and traded live, which is inhumane and cruel in nature. Although international trade in pangolin species was banned more than a decade ago, pangolins are still being poached and sold by the hundreds.


Rotary International President Ron Burton

Governor of District 9700 Geoff Tancred

Coolamon Club President  Dick Jennings

Coolamon Club Secretary Paul Weston

Club Treasurer  Henk Hulsman

Coolamon Rotary Club Inc. P.O. Box 23 COOLAMON N.S.W. 2701

Websites of Interest

Coolamon Rotary Club:

Road MAPS to Africa a Coolamon Rotary Project:

Rotary Down Under on line:

Mount Kenya 2015 Web Site incorporating the ORK:

Our Rotary Centennial Twin Club Hout Bay, Cape Town, South Africa:

Proposed Rotarian Action Group for Endangered Species RAGES:


Register early for Sydney convention and save

Register early for the 2014 Rotary International Convention in  Sydney, Australia, 1-4 June, and pay US$100 less than the on-site  registration fee. Rotary's annual convention is a wonderful way to experience the true internationality of Rotary, as you connect with leaders, exchange ideas, and get inspired to take action to benefit communities worldwide.



See the Bridge as you've never seen it before.

The Sydney Harbour Bridge is more than a photogenic landmark. It's much bigger, much more important than that. We've driven it, walked it, drifted under it and felt that feeling when you glimpse it through the window of a homeward-bound Boeing. The Sydney Harbour Bridge belongs to us. And we want to share it with the world.

Scaling one of Australia’s best-loved icons is an unforgettable journey of sight and sound. From its fascinating underbelly, along its majestic arch, and peaking at its 134m high summit – BridgeClimb offers you the chance to immerse yourself in the spirit of Sydney.

Nearly 3 million local and international people, from as young as ten to the wise old age of 100, have ascended the great arches to stand at the summit. We have welcomed all sorts - loved-up couples, big families, local school teams, worldly backpackers and the latest celebs.

With our local Climb Leaders as your guide - share in an unexpected perspective of the Bridge, its part in Sydney’s story, and its foothold in today’s cityscape.

There are four different climbs to the top - The Bridge Climb, The Discovery ClimbThe Express Climb and introducing The Mandarin Climb. Each climb route is available at all times of the day (The Mandarin Climb is available during the day only). From dawn until dusk, by day and by night, urban Sydney is full of surprises. Take the first step in making the experience your own – choose your climb:



Bulletin Editor and Web Site:  John Glassford

Don’t forget to regularly check our club web site for current information such as bingo rosters and various newsletters from the District Governor, the School of St. Jude’s, the monthly membership on the move newsletter as well as several other club bulletins.






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